READ WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS’S HATE LETTER TO TRUMAN CAPOTE

CAN ONE WRITER CURSE ANOTHER FOR LIFE?

Burroughs and Capote, Aleister Crowley and William Butler Yeats, Alan Moore and Grant Morrison – all of my favorite literary beefs involve a hex of some sort.

“In the below letter, Burroughs engages in a sort of bizarre role-play, claiming (it seems) to speak for a department responsible for the cosmic fate of writers. He tells Capote that he has been following him closely, reading his works, his reviews, and his actions, even interviewing his characters, and that he has decided to withdraw the talent given to him by the department and curse him to never write anything good again—as if he were a minor god of creative action, or king of the muses. Robinson points out that Burroughs actually believed in curses at this time, and maybe he was right, because his damning words came true—he never wrote anything good again.”

“… You have betrayed and sold out the talent that was granted you by this department. That talent is now officially withdrawn. Enjoy your dirty money. You will never have anything else. You will never write another sentence above the level of In Cold Blood. As a writer you are finished. Over and out. Are you tracking me? Know who I am? You know me, Truman. You have known me for a long time. This is my last visit.”